UMEM Educational Pearls

Ever been in an acute rescucitation and found yourself unable to remember all of those famous ACLS Hs and Ts?  I know I have.  A few years ago Littman et al published an alternative approach to critically ill, hypotensive medical patients with non shockable rhythms.  Unfortunately, it seems like some of the enthusiasm for this approach has died down, but I still think it's something you're more likely to recall in a pinch than the Hs and Ts and is a better way of getting started with a hypotensive non-trauma patient.  And it's so simple you may actually remember it!

 

1) Look at the monitor.  Is the rhythm narrow or wide?  

2a) Narrow - more likely a mechanical problem (tamponade, tension PTX, autoPEEP, or PE). Give IVF and search for one of these causes (and correct it!).  Keep in mind that ultrasound can help you differentiate a lot of these.

2b) Wide - more likely a metabolic problem (hyperK, sodium channel blockade, etc*). Give empiric calcium, bicarb, and other therapies targeted for these problems (if desired) and get stat labs.

 

Take a minute and either go to this REBEL EM post:

https://rebelem.com/a-new-pulseless-electrical-activity-algorithm/

To review this, or look at the attached diagrams.  

 

 

*Dr. Mattu would want me to remind you that hyperkalemia IS a sodium channel poisoned state, so there's no need to think of these two separately

References

Rebel EM: https://rebelem.com/a-new-pulseless-electrical-activity-algorithm/

Littmann et al. A Simplified And Structured Teaching Tool for the Evaluation and Management of Pulseless Electrical Activity. Med Princ Pract 2014; 23: 1 – 6. PMID: 23949188


Attachments

Narrow-Complex-PEA-Management-765x456.jpg (96 Kb)

Wide-Complex-PEA-Management-765x444.jpg (83 Kb)