UMEM Educational Pearls

Category: Critical Care

Title: Pearl of the Day - Critical Care

Keywords: PEEP, oxygenation, ventilator (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/14/2007 by Mike Winters, MD (Emailed: 7/10/2007) (Updated: 6/25/2019)
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Mechanical Ventilation "Knobology" - Oxygenation -FiO2 and PEEP are used to improve oxygenation in the ventilated patient -Immediately following intubation, start with an FiO2 of 100% -Increase PEEP by 2-3 cm H2O every 10-15 minutes to achieve the desired saturation -As you titrate PEEP, have respiratory therapy provide you with plateau pressures (maintain Pplat < 30) Mike

Category: Misc

Title: Test of new education blog/listserv

Keywords: Listserv, mailing list, test (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/10/2007 by Dan Lemkin, MD (Emailed: 7/8/2007) (Updated: 6/25/2019)
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I am redesigning the way the educational pearls are sent. You will still receive them via email to the education list. This will not change. What will change, is that a record will be available for review on the website in the residency --> pearls section. Currently you can browse the posts as the come in. In the very near future, you will be able to search by keywords and review several pearls at once. This should serve as a really handy review tool. Please bear with me as I test the email system to ensure it comes across ok. thanks dan

Category: Airway Management

Title: Bougie-Facilitated Intubation

Keywords: Intubation, Bougie, Difficult Airway, Wound Care, Irrigation (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/10/2007 by Michael Bond, MD (Emailed: 7/8/2007) (Updated: 6/25/2019)
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Bougie-Facilitated Intubation Using the Bougie as a rescue device can sometimes be complicated with difficulty advancing the endotracheal tube as the tip can get hang up at the level of the glottis. Two things that can help advance the tube: Rotate the tube 90 degrees counterclockwise. Stop holding Cricoid Pressure, especially in female patients A recent study looking at cricoid pressure showed that the frequency of impingement was 38% with sham pressure and 60% with true cricoid pressure. This statistically significant difference was entirely attributable to an effect in female patients. Original Article: McNelis U et al. The effect of cricoid pressure on intubation facilitated by the gum elastic bougie. Anaesthesia 2007 May; 62:456-9. Forget about Sterile Saline and Use Tap Water Irrigation In a multicenter prospective trial of 715 patients, Moscati et al have shown that rates of wound infection were similar (3.3% compared to 4.0%) in patients that received clinician-administered sterile saline irrigation or at least 2 minutes of self-administered tap-water irrigation. The amount (volume) of irrigation is more important than whether the irrigate is sterile or not. Moscati RM et al. A multicenter comparison of tap water versus sterile saline for wound irrigation. Acad Emerg Med 2007 May; 14:404-9.

Category: ENT

Title: Epistaxis Control

Keywords: Epistaxis, Nose, Bleeding (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/10/2007 by Michael Bond, MD (Emailed: 7/8/2007) (Updated: 6/25/2019)
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Direct Pressure: Can be held with two fingers pinching the nares, or you can tape 4 tongue blades together and make your own "clothes pin" that can then be used to pinch the nares. Vasoconstrictor and Anesthesia: Use a 1:1 mixture of topical lidocaine 4% and oxymetazoline can often be mixed together in the same oxymetazoline spray container and then just spray it into the nares. Some IV/IM narcotic pain medication will also help increase patient cooperation. Visualize the bleeding site: Use a HEAD LAMP with an appropriate sized nasal speculum. You may look like Marcus Welby, MD but nothing works as well to see into the nose. Cauterization It is best to cauterize circumferential around the bleeding site prior to directly cauterizing the actual site. Be careful with electrical cautery so has not to perforate the septum. Nasal Packing: Instead of surgilube use Muprion, Bactroban or Bacitracin ointment to lubricate the packing. This will reduce the chance of Toxic Shock Syndrome.

Category: Pediatrics

Title: Syncope

Keywords: Syncope, Brugada, WPW, Prolonged QTc (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/14/2007 by Sean Fox, MD (Emailed: 7/8/2007) (Updated: 6/25/2019)
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Pediatric Syncope 15-25% of children experience at least one syncopal episode by young adulthood Heart Disease has been the attributed etiology in as high as 10-28% of these cases ==> Historical features suggestive of Cardiac etiology (similar to adults): (1) Onset with exertion (2) No prodome or premonitory symptoms; Resulted in bodily injury (3) Incontinence, Seizure-like activity (4) Abnormal Cardiac Structure or previous cardiac surgery (5) Family Hx of unexplained Death or Accidents (MVC) (6) Required CPR (7) Resulted in neurological insult ==> Get the EKG! Look for (1) WPW (2) Prolonged QTc (3) AV blocks (4) BRUGADA Syndrome Yes, even in kids! Johnsrude, C.L., Current approach to pediatric syncope. Pediatr Cardiol, 2000. 21(6): p. 522-31.

Category: Pediatrics

Title: Pediatric Fever / UTI

Keywords: Fever, UTI, Vesicoureteral Reflux, VCUG (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/14/2007 by Sean Fox, MD (Emailed: 7/8/2007) (Updated: 6/25/2019)
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Pediatric Fever / UTI UTI is one of the most frequent bacterial infections in children. ==> Vesicoureteral Reflux is diagnosed in 30-40% of children found to have a febrile UTI. ==> Vesicoureteral Reflux can lead to recurrent UTIs and Renal Scarring, which can then lead to hypertension and renal insufficiency. Instruct newly diagnosed patients and families to f/u with PMD to schedule renal imaging (renal ultrasound and VCUG). American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on Quality Improvement, Subcommittee on Urinary Tract Infection. Practice parameter: the diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation of the initial urinary tract infection in febrile infants and young children Pediatrics. 2000;105:141.

Category: Pediatrics

Title: Leukokoria

Keywords: Leukokoria, white pupil, retinoblastoma (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/14/2007 by Sean Fox, MD (Emailed: 7/8/2007) (Updated: 6/25/2019)
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Leukokoria The White Pupil Leukokoria is seen in 50-60% of the patients with retinoblastoma Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular malignancy in children, usually detected in the primary care clinic (which the ED often is now) Median age of diagnosis: unilateral = 24 months; bilateral = 12 months Metastatic disease: direct extension to CNS, hematogenous to bones, lung, and brain When detected early, it is one of the most curable childhood cancers Untreated, almost all will die within 2 years Refer anyone without a normal red reflex to an ophthalmologist within 1 week. WG Wilson, JR Serwint. Retinoblastoma. Pediatrics in Review. 2007;28:37-38 Melamud A, Palekar R, Singh A Retinoblastoma. Am Fam Physician. 2006 Mar 15;73(6):1039-44.

Category: Pediatrics

Title: Kawasaki s Disease

Keywords: Kawasaki s, Coronary Artery Aneurysm, fever (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/14/2007 by Sean Fox, MD (Emailed: 7/8/2007) (Updated: 6/25/2019)
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Kawasaki s In the US, Kawasaki Disease is the leading cause of Acquired Heart Disease in Children (surpassing Acute Rheumatic Fever). ==> 15-25% of untreated pts develop coronary artery aneurysm or ectasia. Diagnosis is a clinical one. ==> 5 days of fever PLUS 4/5 clinical features (rash, inflammation of lips/mouth, bilateral conjunctivitis, edema or erythema of hands/feet, and peeling of fingers/toes). No lab values are diagnostic; however, they can strengthen clinical suspicion. ==> CRP and ESR are usually elevated. Thrombocytosis is also common after 1 week of illness. Symptoms are often transient and require careful history. Considered it in the DDx of every child with fever of at least several days duration, rash, and nonpurulent conjunctivitis, especially in children <1 year old and in adolescents, who often have incomplete Kawasaki Disease and are likely to be missed. Newburger, JW. Diagnosis, Treatment, and Long-Term Management of Kawasaki Disease. Circulation. 2004;110:2747-2771.

Category: Toxicology

Title: Acetaminophen Toxicity

Keywords: acetaminophen, hepatic failure, hepatitis (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/14/2007 by Fermin Barrueto, MD (Emailed: 7/8/2007) (Updated: 6/25/2019)
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Acetaminophen Toxicity Hepatoxicity defined by AST >1000 King s College Criteria to prognosticate hepatic failure and need for transplant: o pH <7.3 o Creatinine >3.4 mg/dL o INR >6.5 o Hepatic encephalopathy Grade III or IV Low phosphate (<1.2 mmol/L) may be predictor of survival and elevated may be indicator of impending hepatic failure. (Especially 48 96 hrs post-ingestion) o Theory is phosphate used in regeneration/healing liver Gow PJ, Sood S, Angus PW. Serum phosphate as a predictor of outcome in acetaminophen-induced fulminant hepatic failure. Hepatology. 2003; 37(3):711.

Category: Toxicology

Title: Botulinum Toxin

Keywords: botulinum toxin, paralysis, heroin (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/14/2007 by Fermin Barrueto, MD (Emailed: 7/8/2007) (Updated: 6/25/2019)
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Botulinum Toxin Most potent toxin on the planet where 7 picograms IV are lethal to a human Characterized by a descending flaccid paralysis w/o fever bulbar findings 1st Weapon of Mass Destruction but also seen in the IVDA Heroin population Black Tar Heroin outbreak with necrotic ulcers that produced C. botulinum o Most recently in Washington DC 2003 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Wound botulism among black tar heroin users--Washington, 2003. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2003;52(37):885-6.

Category: Toxicology

Title: Diagnosing Salicylate Toxicity

Keywords: Salicylate, aspirin, ferric chloride (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/14/2007 by Fermin Barrueto, MD (Emailed: 7/8/2007) (Updated: 6/25/2019)
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Diagnosing Salicylate Toxicity - Acute ingestion can initiially present with nausea, vomiting and a respiratory alkalosis - Toxicity defined by an anion gap metabolic acidosis with ketosis and normal glucose - Ferric chloride test (can get from chemistry set): couple of drops into urine, if it changes color to deep purple sensitive positive for presence of salicylate (sensitive but not specific)

Category: Toxicology

Title: Hyperthermia

Keywords: hyperthermia, serotonin syndrome, neuroleptic malignant syndrome (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/14/2007 by Fermin Barrueto, MD (Emailed: 7/8/2007) (Updated: 6/25/2019)
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Hyperthermia Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (Dopamine Inhibition): treat with bromocriptine Serotonin Syndrome (5-HT1A agonism): treat with serotonin antagonist Malignant Hyperthermia (Genetic): treat with dantrolene

Category: Cardiology

Title: Ventricular dysrhythmias in pregnanc

Keywords: Dysrhythmia, Pregnancy, Treatment, Procainamide (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/14/2007 by Amal Mattu, MD (Emailed: 7/8/2007) (Updated: 6/25/2019)
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Ventricular dysrhythmias in pregnancy Amiodarone should be considered a last choice in pregnancy. It is the only class D antiarrhythmic, and even short infusions can be associated with fetal hypothyroidism, IUGR, fetal bradycardia, and prematurity. Lidocaine or procainamide are preferred. Also, cardioversion/defibrillation/pacing is considered safe in any stage of pregnancy.

Category: Cardiology

Title: GI Bleed and Myocardial Ischemia

Keywords: GI Bleed, Myocardial Ischemia, ECG (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/14/2007 by Amal Mattu, MD (Emailed: 7/8/2007) (Updated: 6/25/2019)
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GI Bleed and Myocardial Ischemia Myocardial ischemia or infarction occurs in up to 20% of patients with significant UGI bleeds. For reasons that are uncertain, the majority of these patients have "silent" MIs (i.e. no pain). It's also unclear whether these patients develop MI purely because of hypoperfusion or because the stress causes a plaque to rupture and thrombose. Whenever you have a patient with a massive UGIB, get an ECG early, regardless of whether or not the patient is having chest pain, and if it's concerning, get cardiology involved early as well. anecdote--I've seen 2 patients with STEMI in the presence of an UGIB, one at Mercy and one at UMMS; neither had chest pain; both got transfused, seen by GI, and went cath within several hours; the takeaway--get both consultants involved EARLY!

Category: Cardiology

Title: Cardiovascular trauma

Keywords: Cardiovascular, CXR, ECG, rupture (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/14/2007 by Amal Mattu, MD (Emailed: 7/8/2007) (Updated: 6/25/2019)
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Cardiovascular trauma Up to 40% of traumatic aortic ruptures/disruptions in patients surviving to the ED will be associated with normal-looking mediastinums on CXR. Therefore, a CTA or angiogram should be ordered purely based on a good mechanism of sudden deceleration.

Category: Cardiology

Title: Rapid Atrial Fibrillation Treatment

Keywords: Afib, Atrial Fibrillation, Treatment (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/14/2007 by Amal Mattu, MD (Emailed: 7/8/2007) (Updated: 6/25/2019)
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Rapid Atrial Fibrillation Treatment 50% of patients with new AF spontaneously convert within 48 hours AF > 48 hours --> chances of spontaneous conversion decreases and chance of embolization increases significantly Most EM texts and lecturers still recommend diltiazem as first line medication for early rate control Patients in whom beta blockers are preferred: AMI, thyrotoxicosis, or if patient is already on BBs NEVER combine IV beta blockers and IV calcium channel blockers --> synergistic effect will cause hemodynamic compromise; start with one type of medication and stay with it

Category: Critical Care

Title: Serial lactate Levels

Keywords: Lactate, Sepsis, Infection (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/14/2007 by Mike Winters, MD (Emailed: 7/8/2007) (Updated: 6/25/2019)
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Obtain serial lactate levels in ED patients with infection * Elevated serum lactate is associated with an increased risk of death in critically ill patients with infection * An initial lactate level > 4.0 mmol/l is significant and, in some series, is associated with a mortality of approximately 40% * Obtain serial venous lactate measurements every 3-4 hours * If serial levels remain > 4 mmol/l, or rise, be more aggressive with resuscitation Reference: Trzeciak S, et al. Serum lactate as a predictor of mortality in patients with infection. Inten Care Med 2007;33:970-7.


Category: Critical Care

Title: Start antibiotics ASAP in patients with septic shock

Keywords: Antiobiotics, Sepsis (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/14/2007 by Mike Winters, MD (Emailed: 7/8/2007) (Updated: 6/25/2019)
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Start antibiotics ASAP in patients with septic shock * For patients with septic shock, start antibiotics within the first hour * For each additional hour that antibiotics are delayed, survival decreases by 7%-8%! * Once you address the ABC's, obtain appropriate cultures, and hang the antimicrobials * Make sure you are providing effective antimicrobials (take a look at the patient's history to see if they have resistant bugs) Reference: Kumar A, et al. Duration of hypotension before initiation of effective antimicrobial therapy is the critical determinant of survival in septic shock. Crit Care Med 2006;34:1589-96.

Category: Critical Care

Title: Intubated Patients HOB Recommendations

Keywords: Intubation, ventilation, VAP, bed (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/14/2007 by Mike Winters, MD (Emailed: 7/8/2007) (Updated: 6/25/2019)
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In the absence of contraindications, keep the head of the bed elevated 30 degrees for intubated patients * Mechanical ventilation places patients at risk for ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) * ICU mortality for VAP ranges from 30% to 70% * Elevating the head of the bed has been shown to decrease the frequency of VAP Reference: Dodek P, Keenan S, Cook D, et al. Evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia. Ann Intern Med 2004;141:305-13.

Category: Critical Care

Title: Life- or Limb-saving Escharotomy

Keywords: Escharotomy, burn, ischemia (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/14/2007 by Mike Winters, MD (Emailed: 7/8/2007) (Updated: 6/25/2019)
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Life- or Limb-saving Escharotomy * At some point in your career you may have to perform an emergent escharotomy to safe a life or limb * Deep thickness circumferential chest burns act like a straight jacket and impair respiration * Circumferential limb burns act like a tourniquet and impairs both venous output and arterial input resulting in ischemia * Limb escharotomy should be performed as soon as pulses diminish - do not wait for them to disappear * The picture illustrates the incision lines for escharotomy (note the bold lines highlight the importance of going across any involved joint)

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