UMEM Educational Pearls

Category: Misc

Title: Medical Management Ureteral Stones

Keywords: Ureteral, stone, tamsulosin, management (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/21/2007 by Michael Bond, MD (Updated: 10/20/2019)
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Medical Management of Ureteral Stones Tamsulosin (Flomax ) has been shown to help increase the passage of ureteral calculi. According to a metaanalysis compared to patients receiving conservative therapy only, patients receiving conservative therapy plus α -blockers were 44% more likely to spontaneously expel the stones (RR 1.44, 95% CI 1.31 to 1.59, p0.001), and stone expulsion incidence increased significantly (RD 0.28, 95% CI 0.22 to 0.34, p0.001). Mechanism of action: Alpha blockage results in ureteral smooth muscle relaxtion and subsequent inhibition of ureteral spasms and dilatation of the ureteral lumen. Erturhan S. Erbagci A. Yagci F. Celik M. Solakhan M. Sarica K. Comparative evaluation of efficacy of use of tamsulosin and/or tolterodine for medical treatment of distal ureteral stones. [Comparative Study. Journal Article. Randomized Controlled Trial] Urology. 69(4):633-6, 2007 Apr. Parsons JK. Hergan LA. Sakamoto K. Lakin C. Efficacy of alpha-blockers for the treatment of ureteral stones. [Journal Article. Meta-Analysis] Journal of Urology. 177(3):983-7; discussion 987, 2007 Mar.

Category: Pediatrics

Title: Nursemaid's Elbow

Keywords: Nursemaid's Elbow, Radial Head Subluxation (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/20/2007 by Sean Fox, MD (Updated: 10/20/2019)
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Nursemaid's Elbow PRESENTATION ==> Radial head subluxation is VERY common; most often seen in ages of 1-4 yrs. ==> Arm is held close to the body, elbow flexed and forearm pronated. MANAGEMENT ==> If the history and physical are classic, no X-rays are needed. Obtain x-rays if there is pain to palpation of long bones (rule out Monteggia fx) or the story is not classic. ==> Hold elbow at 90 degrees, then firmly supinate and simultaneously flex the elbow. ==> Place thumb over region of radial head and apply pressure as you supinate. May also need to extend elbow to help screw radial head back in place. POST-REDUCTION ==> Immobilation is not necessary for 1st episode ==> If delayed reduction (>12 hours), place in long arm posterior splint in full supination and elbow @90 degrees http://www.wheelessonline.com/ortho/nursemaids_elbow_radial_head_subluxation

Category: Toxicology

Title: Activated Charcoal

Keywords: Gastrointestinal decontamination, activated charcoal, poisoning (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/19/2007 by Fermin Barrueto, MD (Updated: 10/20/2019)
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Gastrointestinal Decontamination - Activated Charcoal Pharmacist P.f. Touery, in 1831, making a demonstration of the effectiveness of charcoal before the French academy of Medicine, survived after swallowing 15 g of strychnine (10x lethal dose) and an equal amount of charcoal - 3 tablespoons. (That's for you Dr. Rolnick) - Assess the patients' chance of becoming unresponsive or vomiting in relation to the ingestion if known. - Maximal benefit if given within 1 hour of ingestion, drug is likely still in the stomach. - No study has yet to show decrease in morbidity or mortality when empirically given to all ingestions. - Only one study has shown multi-dose activated charcoal to decrease morbidity and mortality and that was with a drug (oleander is like digoxin) that is enterohepatically metabolized. de Silva HA, et al. Multiple-dose activated charcoal for treatment of yellow oleander poisoning: a single-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial. Lancet. 2003 Jun 7;361(9373):1935-8.

Category: Critical Care

Title: Mechanical Ventilation "Knobology" - respiratory failure

Keywords: mechanical ventilation, assist control, SIMV, pressure support (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/17/2007 by Mike Winters, MD (Updated: 10/20/2019)
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-One of the most common reasons for intubation/mechanical ventilation in the ED is patient fatigue -Essentially, patients are unable to keep up with the work of breathing -Patient work of breathing can be significant in CPAP, SIMV, and Pressure Support modes of mechanical ventilation -Avoid these as initial modes if your patient has respiratory fatigue

Category: Vascular

Title: Aortic Dissection

Keywords: aortic dissection, chest, abdominal, pain, malpractice (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/16/2007 by Rob Rogers, MD (Updated: 10/20/2019)
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Most common themes in medical malpractice cases involving missed aortic dissection: -Some combination of chest/back, chest/abdomen, or abdomen/back -Symptoms "above and below" the diaphragm (neck pain and abdominal pain, for e.g.) Sullivan, SullivanGroup.com 2006 Acute Aortic Disease, Elefteriades 2007

Category: Cardiology

Title: treatment of acute pericarditis

Keywords: pericarditis, treatment, colchicine, steroids (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/15/2007 by Amal Mattu, MD (Updated: 10/20/2019)
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-Most patients with acute pericarditis are effectively treated with high-dose aspirin or NSAIDS + colchicine - Aspirin dose: 2-4 gms/day - Colchicine dose: 1-2 mg for first day, then 0.5-1 mg/day for 3 months - The use of steroids in first-time acute pericarditis should be avoided, as it has been found to increase the chances of recurrence

Category: Trauma

Title: Traumatic Ankle Pain

Keywords: Ankle, Maisonneuve, Jones, Fracture (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/14/2007 by Michael Bond, MD (Updated: 10/20/2019)
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Traumatic Ankle Pain When examining a patient who presents with Ankle Pain, make sure that you examine/palpate the proximal fibula and the base of the fifth metatarsal. Pain over the proximal fibula will necessitate a full Tibia/Fibula x-ray to rule out a Maisonneuve Fracture [a proximal fracture of fibula resulting from external rotation; injury may occur with medial or posterior malleolus fracture, a ligament rupture, as well as rupture of interosseous membrane. Pain over the base of the 5th metatarsal suggests a Jones Fracture [ involves fx at base of fifth metatarsal at metaphyseal-diaphyseal junction, which typically extends into the 4-5 intermetatarsal facet; is located w/in 1.5 cm distal to tuberosity of 5th metatarsal & should not be confused w/ more common avulsion fx (Dancer s Fracture) of 5th metatarsal styloid]

Category: Pediatrics

Title: Bronchiolitis

Keywords: Bronchiolitis, Bronchodilators, Steroids, Supplemental Oxygen (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/14/2007 by Sean Fox, MD (Emailed: 7/13/2007) (Updated: 10/20/2019)
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Bronchiolitis The most common lower respiratory infection in infants Diagnosis is based on clinical history and physical. No lab test is useful. Management - Bronchodilators should not be used routinely. They can be continued if the pt has a positive response after a trial. - Corticosteroids have not been found to be of benefit. - Antibiotics should not be used, unless indicated for other reasons. - Ribaviran has not demonstrated any benefit. - Use Supplemental oxygen if the patient is persistently sat'ing <90%. Subcommittee on Diagnosis and Management of Bronchiolitis. Diagnosis and Management of Bronchiolitis. PEDIATRICS Vol. 118 No. 4 October 2006, pp. 1774-1793

Category: Toxicology

Title: One Pill Killers for Children

Keywords: pediatric, poisoning, overdose (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/14/2007 by Fermin Barrueto, MD (Emailed: 7/12/2007) (Updated: 10/20/2019)
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One Pill Killers for Children Drug Class Mechanism of Action that Kills Sulfonylureas These hypoglycemic agents (ie. Glyburide) also have a long t Opioids Respiratory depression Imidazoline Clonidine and Oxymetazolone (nasal spray) cause bradycardia and respiratory depression Ca Channel Blockers Bradycardia & hypotension, especially diltiazem and verapamil Beta Blockers Extended release preparations are problematic There are some others but these are the most commonly prescribed pharmaceuticals. Remember, children under age 6 will not be able to swallow a pill and the pill itself is choking hazard. Proper poison prevention education for the parents is also needed.

Category: Critical Care

Title: Pearl of the Day - Critical Care

Keywords: PEEP, oxygenation, ventilator (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/14/2007 by Mike Winters, MD (Emailed: 7/10/2007) (Updated: 10/20/2019)
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Mechanical Ventilation "Knobology" - Oxygenation -FiO2 and PEEP are used to improve oxygenation in the ventilated patient -Immediately following intubation, start with an FiO2 of 100% -Increase PEEP by 2-3 cm H2O every 10-15 minutes to achieve the desired saturation -As you titrate PEEP, have respiratory therapy provide you with plateau pressures (maintain Pplat < 30) Mike

Category: Misc

Title: Test of new education blog/listserv

Keywords: Listserv, mailing list, test (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/10/2007 by Dan Lemkin, MD (Emailed: 7/8/2007) (Updated: 10/20/2019)
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I am redesigning the way the educational pearls are sent. You will still receive them via email to the education list. This will not change. What will change, is that a record will be available for review on the website in the residency --> pearls section. Currently you can browse the posts as the come in. In the very near future, you will be able to search by keywords and review several pearls at once. This should serve as a really handy review tool. Please bear with me as I test the email system to ensure it comes across ok. thanks dan

Category: Vascular

Title: Pulmonary Embolism Rule Out

Keywords: D-Dimer, PE, Well's (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/14/2007 by Rob Rogers, MD (Emailed: 7/8/2007) (Updated: 10/20/2019)
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Update on the Wells Criteria for PE-patients with a score of 4 or less (which means low to moderate probability) can be considered for a "d-dimer negative" rule out approach. This is a bit of a change from the low risk only approach. Additionally, the British Thoracic Society guidelines support the low and moderate risk group patient rule out strategy. So, if you have a low or even moderate risk patient, you can use the approach of obtaining a highly sensitive d-dimer and if it is negative, the hunt for PE is over.

Category: Pediatrics

Title: Inborn Errors of Metabolisn

Keywords: Inborn Errors of Metabolism, Hypoglycemia, organomegaly (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/14/2007 by Sean Fox, MD (Emailed: 7/8/2007) (Updated: 10/20/2019)
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Inborn Errors of Metabolism For the child with neurologic abnormalities, vomiting, acidosis, hypoglycemia, organomegaly, or cardiopulmonary arrest remember to consider Inborn Errors of Metabolism (IEM) on your DDx. There are over 300 disorders of the various biochemical pathways, and while the individual incidence for each disorder may be rare, the collective incidence for IEM is 1-2 / 1,000 births. Treat dehydration and hypoglycemia promptly but FIRST, draw EXTRA blood samples (at UMMS, two adult Green Tops and one adult Red Top) in addition to the basic labs. ==> Once you begin therapy to correct the acid/base disturbance, hypoglycemia, and dehydration the abnormal metabolites present in their serum will be reduced and possibly confound the diagnosis. ==> Draw the extra blood, before your give the NS bolus or the Dextrose! ==> Basic Labs (1) ABG, BMP, Ammonia, U/A are helpful immediately (2) CBC, Blood and Urine Cultures (look for concurrent infection, possibly the inciting event) (3) Urine Reducing Substances, serum organic acids, urine and serum amino acids are also useful

Category: Pediatrics

Title: Bacterial tracheitis

Keywords: Bacterial tracheitis, stridor, croup, epiglottitis (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/14/2007 by Sean Fox, MD (Emailed: 7/8/2007) (Updated: 10/20/2019)
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Bacterial Tracheitis Considered bacterial tracheitis in a patient who has fever, stridor, and symptoms that do not respond to therapy for croup (racemic epinephrine and steroids). The epidemiology of acute infectious upper airway disease in pediatrics has been altered with immunization against Haemophilus influenza- b and the widespread use of corticosteroids for the treatment of viral croup. Bacterial Tracheitis has replaced epiglottitis and croup as the most common cause of acute respiratory failure. One study found it to be 3 times more likely to cause respiratory failure than croup and epiglotittis combined. The mortality rates had been reported as high as 18% to 40%. Hopkins, A., et al., Changing epidemiology of life-threatening upper airway infections: the reemergence of bacterial tracheitis. Pediatrics, 2006. 118(4): p. 1418-21.

Category: Toxicology

Title: Cyanide

Keywords: cyanide, poisoning, hydroxycobalamin (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/14/2007 by Fermin Barrueto, MD (Emailed: 7/8/2007) (Updated: 10/20/2019)
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Cyanide Presents with arterialization of venous blood (venous blood draw looks like ABG) Reason: o Hemoglobin is not able to offload oxygen o CN poisons cytochrome c oxidase preventing conversion of oxygen to water and thus production of ATP Old antidote: sodium thiosulfate New antidote: hydroxycobalamin binds CN producing cyanocobalamin (Vit B12) When you give it expects a dip in pulse because of its blue color. Remember CN will give you a beautiful 100% pulse all the way to death. Lee J, et al. Potential interference by hydroxocobalamin on cooximetry hemoglobin measurements during cyanide and smoke inhalation treatments. Ann Emerg Med. 2007 Jun;49(6):802-5. Epub 2007 Jan 8.

Category: Toxicology

Title: Hydrofluoric Acid (HF)

Keywords: hydrofluoric acid, hypocalcemia, burn (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/14/2007 by Fermin Barrueto, MD (Emailed: 7/8/2007) (Updated: 10/20/2019)
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Hydrofluoric Acid (HF) Used in glass etching, brick/porcelain cleaning and available in hardware stores Death has been reported after JUST 2-3% body surface area exposure! Systemic toxicity: hypocalcemia, hyperkalemia and hypomagensemia Local effects: paucity of skin findings with tremendous pain Treatment: skin decontamination, correct electrolyte abnormalities and topical calcium gel for local pain Mayer TG, GrossPI. Fatal systemic fluoride due to hydrofluoric acid burns. Ann Emerg Med 1985; 14: 149-153.

Category: Cardiology

Title: Dyspnea

Posted: 7/14/2007 by Amal Mattu, MD (Emailed: 7/8/2007) (Updated: 10/20/2019)
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Elderly are more likely to present with dyspnea (49% [the most common anginal equivalent]), diaphoresis (26%), nausea and vomiting (24%), and syncope (19%) as a primary complaint. The takeaway point: always get that ECG early in elderly patients with these complaints, even when CP is absent!

Category: Cardiology

Title: AMI versus Aneurysm

Posted: 7/14/2007 by Amal Mattu, MD (Emailed: 7/8/2007) (Updated: 10/20/2019)
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AMI versus Aneurysm For ECG distinction between AMI versus ventricular aneurysm, look for reciprocal changes and height of T-waves: 1. Reciprocal ST depression strongly favors AMI. 2. Large T-waves in leads with Q waves and STE is likely AMI. Ventricular aneurysm usually gives you "blunted" or flat T-waves in those leads.

Category: Critical Care

Title: Pacer Cordis

Keywords: Pacer, Cordis, transvenous (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/14/2007 by Mike Winters, MD (Emailed: 7/8/2007) (Updated: 10/20/2019)
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Make sure the Cordis is the right size when floating a pacing wire * At some point in your career, you may need to "float" a transvenous pacing wire * When inserting the wire, you need to make sure you have the right size Cordis * In general, a pacing wire should be inserted through a 6F Cordis (0.198 mm) * Many introducer kits have a 7.5F Cordis (0.2475mm) that is used for insertion of a PAC * Blood loss, infection, and air embolism are risks that can occur when the Cordis catheter used is too large Reference: 1. Marcucci L, ed. Avoiding common ICU errors. Philadelphia; Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2007:275-6.

Category: Critical Care

Title: TRALI - Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury

Keywords: Transfusion, Lung, Injury (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/14/2007 by Mike Winters, MD (Emailed: 7/8/2007) (Updated: 10/20/2019)
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TRALI - Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury * TRALI has now emerged as the primary cause of transfusion-associated mortality, surpassing infectious complications and ABO mismatch * TRALI is defined as new ALI in a patient receiving, or having just received (within the past 6 hours), a blood product transfusion * All plasma-containing products have been implicated (FFP and platelets are the top offenders) * Clinically, patients present with dyspnea, tachypnea, and hypoxia * CXR findings are consistent with noncardiogenic pulmonary edema * There is no unique treatment for TRALI; most patients have resolution within 96 hours * AVOID diuretics as these patients are often volume depleted Reference: 1. Looney MR. Newly recognized causes of acute lung injury: transfusion of blood products, severe acute respiratory syndrome, and avian influenza. Clin Chest Med 2006;27:591-600.