UMEM Educational Pearls

Category: Critical Care

Title:

Keywords: Botulism, IVDA (PubMed Search)

Posted: 7/2/2019 by Robert Brown, MD (Emailed: 11/19/2019)
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Takeaways

Don’t miss the injecting drug users with botulism!

Wound botulism presents as descending paralysis when Clostridium botulinum spores germinate in anaerobic necrotic tissue. There have been hundreds of cases in the last decade, but it is poorly reported outside of California.

Black tar heroin and subcutaneous injection (“skin popping”) carry the highest risk, but other injected drugs and other types of drug use suffice. C botulinum spores are viable unless cooked at or above 85°C for 5 minutes or longer and this is not achieved when cooking drugs. 

Early administration of botulism anti-toxin (BAT) not only saves lives but can prevent paralysis and mechanical ventilation. An outbreak of 9 cases between September 2017 and April 2018 cost roughly $2.3 million, in part because patients didn’t present on average until 48 hours after symptom onset and it took an additional 2-4 days before the true cause of their respiratory depression and lethargy were understood. One patient died.

PEARL: talk to your injecting drug users about the symptoms of botulism: muscle weakness, difficulty swallowing, blurred vision, drooping eyelids, slurred speech, loss of facial expression, descending paralysis, and difficulty breathing. Consider botulism early in your patients who inject drugs but who do not respond to naloxone or who exhibit prolonged symptoms. Testing at the health department is performed with mouse antibodies to Botulism Neurotoxin (BoNT) combined with the patient’s serum.

 

 

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Category: International EM

Title: Fever and Polyarthralgia

Keywords: International, Chikungunya, vector-borne, (PubMed Search)

Posted: 3/5/2014 by Andrea Tenner, MD (Emailed: 11/19/2019)
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Case Presentation:

53 yo male presents with fever, myalgia, maculopapular rash, and severe polyarthralgia. He just returned from a cruise to the Caribbean islands.

Clinical Question:

What is the diagnosis?

Answer:

Chikungunya Virus

  • Travelers who go to the Caribbean are at risk of getting chikungunya. Cases have been reported in Saint Martin, Martinique, and Guadeloupe. In addition, travelers to Africa, Asia, and islands in the Indian Ocean and Western Pacific are also at risk.
  • Mosquito vector, incubation 3-7 days
  • Joints involved are typically hands and feet, usually symmetric, severe arthralgia often debilitating
  • Dx: serology - ELISA, IgM
  • Treatment: IVF, NSAIDS, supportive

Bottom Line:

  • Include Chikungunya in your differential of non-specific fever, rash, headache and arthralgia in travelers the Caribbean and endemic areas.

University of Maryland Section of Global Emergency Health

Author: Veronica Pei, MD

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Category: Critical Care

Title: Utilization of the Mechanical Ventilator in Cardiac Arrest

Keywords: CPR, Cardiac Arrest (PubMed Search)

Posted: 11/15/2016 by Rory Spiegel, MD (Emailed: 11/19/2019)
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It is well documented that when left to our own respiratory devices we will consistently over-ventilate patients presenting in cardiac arrest (1). A simple and effective method of preventing these overzealous tendencies is the utilization of a ventilator in place of a BVM. The ventilator is not typically used during cardiac arrest resuscitation because the high peak-pressures generated when chest compressions are being performed cause the ventilator to terminate the breath prior to the delivery of the intended tidal volume. This can easily be overcome by turning the peak-pressure alarm to its maximum setting. A number of studies have demonstrated the feasibility of this technique, most recently a cohort in published in Resuscitation by Chalkias et al (2). The 2010 European Resuscitation Council guidelines recommend a volume control mode at 6-7 mL/kg and 10 breaths/minute (3).

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Category: Critical Care

Title:

Keywords: amikacin, Torsades de pointes, QT prolongation (PubMed Search)

Posted: 8/20/2019 by Quincy Tran, MD (Emailed: 11/19/2019)
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Torsades de pointes and QT prolongation Associated with Antibiotics

 

Methods

The authors queried the United States FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) from 01/01/2015 to 12/31/2017 for reports of Torsade de points/QT prolongation (TdP/QT).

Reporting Odd Ratio (ROR) was calculated as the ratio of the odds of reporting TdP/QTP versus all other ADRs for a given drug, compared with these reporting odds for all other drugs present in FAERS

Results

FAERS contained 2,042,801 reports from January 1, 2015 to December 31, 2017. There were 3,960 TdP/QTP reports from the study period (0.19%).

 

Macrolides               ROR 14 (95% CI 11.8-17.38)

Linezolid                  ROR 12 (95% CI 8.5-18)

Amikacin                 ROR 11.8 (5.57-24.97)

Imipenem-cilastatin ROR 6.6 (3.13-13.9)

Fluoroquinolones   ROR 5.68 (95% CI 4.78-6.76)

 

Limitations:

These adverse events are voluntary reports

There might be other confounded by concomitant drugs such as ondansetron, azole anti-fungals, antipsychotics.

 

Bottom Line:

This study confimed the previously-known antibiotics to be associated with Torsades de pointes and QT prolongation (Macrolides, Linezolid, Imipenem and Fluoroquinolones). However, this study  found new association between amikacin and Torsades de pointes/QT prolongation.

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Category: Visual Diagnosis

Title: What's the Diagnosis? Case by Dr. Ali Farzad

Posted: 4/7/2014 by Haney Mallemat, MD (Emailed: 11/19/2019) (Updated: 11/19/2019)
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Question

23 year-old female presents complaining of progressive right lower quadrant pain after doing "vigorous" pushups. CT abdomen/pelvis below. What’s the diagnosis? (Hint: it’s not appendicitis)

 

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Category: Critical Care

Title:

Keywords: Right Ventricle, RV Size (PubMed Search)

Posted: 11/5/2019 by Kim Boswell, MD (Emailed: 11/19/2019)
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Rapid Assessment of the RV on Bedside Echo

There are several causes of acute RV dysfunction resulting in a patient presenting to the ER with unstable hemodynamics. Some of these include acute cor pulmonale, acute right sided myocardial infarction and acute submassive or massive pulmonary embolism. While bedside assessment of the LV function is often performed by the ED physician, simultaneous evaluation of the RV can provide crucial information that can help guide therapeutic decisions to prevent worsening of the patient’s clinical condition. A rough guideline to determine RV size and function is below using the apical 4 chamber view.

Normal RV size :            <2/3 the size of the LV

Mildly enlarged RV :       >2/3 the size of the LV, but not equal in size

Moderately enlarged RV:  RV size = LV size

Severely enlarged RV:      RV size > LV size

Patients who are found to have RV dilation should be given fluids in a judicious fashion as the RV is not tolerant of fluid overload. Early diagnosis of the cause of acute RV failure should be sought to guide definitive therapy, but early institution of inotropic support should be considered. Frequent reassessments of biventricular function during resuscitation should be performed.

 

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Presentation2.pptx (178 Kb)


Category: Critical Care

Title: Lung Protective Ventilation in the Emergency Deparment

Keywords: lung protective ventilation, ARDS (PubMed Search)

Posted: 3/21/2017 by Rory Spiegel, MD (Emailed: 11/19/2019)
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While lung protective ventilatory strategies have long been accepted as vital to the management of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation, the translation of such practices to the Emergency Department is still limited and inconsistent.

Fuller et al employed a protocol ensuring lung-protective tidal volumes, appropriate setting of positive end-expiratory pressure, rapid weaning of FiO2, and elevating the head-of-bed. The authors found that the number of patients who had lung protective strategies employed in the Emergency Department increased from 46.0% to 76.7%. This increase in protective strategies was associated with a 7.1% decrease in the rate of pulmonary complications (ARDS and VACs), 14.5% vs 7.4%, and a 14.3% decrease in in-hospital mortality, 34.1% vs 19.6%.

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Category: Toxicology

Title: Hydrofluoric Acid Burns

Keywords: hydrofluoric acid, burn, chemical burn, HFA, calcium gluconate (PubMed Search)

Posted: 9/5/2010 by Dan Lemkin, MD (Emailed: 11/19/2019) (Updated: 10/2/2010)
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Hydrofluoric acid is a weak acid used primarily in industrial applications for glass etching and metal cleaning/plating. It is contained in home rust removers. Although technically a weak acid, it is very dangerous and burns can be subtle in appearance while having severe consequences.

Hydrofluoric acid burn

Wilkes G. Hydrofluoric Acid Burns. Jan 28, 2010. 
http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/773304-overview

  • 2 mechanisms that cause tissue damage*
    • corrosive burn from the free hydrogen ions
    • chemical burn from tissue penetration of the fluoride ions
  • Clinical features*
    • Cutaneous burns - absent findings to white-blue appearance
    • Pulmonary edema
    • Hypocalcemia, hyperkalemia, hypomagnesemia
  • Treatment*
    • Decontaminate by irrigation with copious amounts of water.
    • With any evidence of hypocalcemia, immediately administer 10% calcium gluconate IV.
    • Cutaneous burns:
      • Apply 2.5% calcium gluconate gel to the affected area. If the proprietary gel is not available, constitute by dissolving 10% calcium gluconate solution in 3 times the volume of a water-soluble lubricant (eg, KY gel). For burns to the fingers, retain gel in a latex glove.
      • If pain persists for more than 30 minutes after application of calcium gluconate gel, further treatment is required. Subcutaneous infiltration of calcium gluconate is recommended at a dose of 0.5 mL of a 5% solution per square centimeter of surface burn extending 0.5 cm beyond the margin of involved tissue (10% calcium gluconate solution can be irritating to the tissue).
        • Do not use the chloride salt because it is an irritant and may cause tissue damage.

*Extracted from emedicine article.

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Question

50 year-old male with cough and dyspnea. What's the diagnosis?

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Category: Visual Diagnosis

Title: Visual Dx (Courtesy of Maite Huis in 't Veld)

Posted: 10/5/2018 by Michael Bond, MD (Emailed: 11/19/2019) (Updated: 11/19/2019)
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Question

33 y/o M with PMH of ETOH induced pancreatitis presents with epigastic/RUQ pain & N/V after drinking last night, per patient his usual “pancreas pain”. The nurse shows you his blood tubes because they look “milky”. Lipase 1200, Ca 6.8.

 



What lab test would you add?

 

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Category: Pediatrics

Title: Tinea Capitis

Posted: 3/9/2013 by Rose Chasm, MD (Emailed: 11/19/2019) (Updated: 11/19/2019)
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  • Tinea capitis (ringworm of the scalp) is caused by dermatophytic fungi
  • Trichophyton tonsurans is the most common species in the US, and does NOT flouresce under Wood's lamp
  • Griseofulvin (20-25mg/kg/ day orally) is the standard first-line therapy in children older than 2 years, and has a good safety profile
  • Both tablet and suspension formulations are available, and it should be taken with food that are high in fat to increase drug concentrations
  • NO laboratory assessment of hepatic enzymes is required during the 8-week therapy course in children who have no history or clinical examination findings concerning for liver disease.
  • Topical antifungal agents are ineffective because they do not penetrate sufficiently into the hair shaft.

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Category: Pediatrics

Title: Visual Diagnosis Pediatrics: Case thanks to Ari Kestler MD (@KestlerMD) and Haney Mallemat MD (@CriticalCareNow)

Keywords: non-accidental trauma, clavicle fracture, neonate, pediatrics, abuse (PubMed Search)

Posted: 10/4/2014 by Ashley Strobel, MD (Emailed: 11/19/2019)
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Question

Q: What is wrong with this baby? And what Dx should you entertain?

Previously healthy 7d old presents after difficulty feeding, one episode of vomiting and now with intermittent apneic episodes.

 

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Attachments

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Category: Orthopedics

Title: Fulcrum test

Posted: 10/1/2017 by Brian Corwell, MD (Emailed: 11/19/2019) (Updated: 11/19/2019)
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https://www.physio-pedia.com/Fulcrum_Test


Category: Orthopedics

Title: Morel-Lavall e lesion

Posted: 10/1/2017 by Brian Corwell, MD (Emailed: 11/19/2019) (Updated: 11/19/2019)
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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4126145/


Category: Critical Care

Title: Adrenal Insufficiency

Posted: 4/12/2013 by Haney Mallemat, MD (Emailed: 11/19/2019) (Updated: 11/19/2019)
Click here to contact Haney Mallemat, MD

Adrenal insufficiency (AI) can be a life-threating condition and is classified as primary (failure of the adrenal gland) or secondary (failure of hypothalamic- pituitary axis).

Common causes of primary adrenal insufficiency include autoimmune destruction, infectious causes (TB and CMV), or interactions with drugs (e.g., anti-fungals, Etomidate, etc.). Secondary causes are usually due to abrupt withdrawal of steroids after chronic use, although sepsis and diseases of the hypothalamus or pituitary (e.g., CVA) may occur.

Signs and symptoms include fatigue, weakness, skin pigmentation, dizziness, abdominal pain, and orthostatic hypotension; it should be suspected with any of the following: hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, hypoglycemia, hypercalcemia, low free-cortisol level, and hemodynamic instability despite resuscitation.

Treatment:
• Correct underlying the disorder
• Resuscitation and hemodynamic support
• Correct hypoglycemia and electrolyte abnormalities
• Treat with hydrocortisone, cortisone, prednisone, or dexamethasone +/- fludrocortisone (Note: dexamethasone is attractive choice in the ED because it will not interfere with ACTH stimulation test)


 

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